Articles Posted in Order of Protection

Published on:

by

In Dayonna W. v. Jhon S. 201 A.D.3d 539 (N.Y. App. Div. 2022), an order of protection was issued against the respondent, directing him to stay away from the petitioner until June 10, 2023. The order stemmed from a fact-finding determination that the respondent committed the family offenses of second-degree harassment and third-degree assault.

In Family Court, the determination of the length and terms of an order of protection is based on several factors, primarily focused on ensuring the safety and well-being of the petitioner. The court considers the specific circumstances of each case, including the nature and severity of the alleged offenses, the relationship between the parties involved, and any history of violence or harassment.

One consideration is the extent of the perceived threat to the petitioner’s safety. If the court finds that there is a substantial risk of harm to the petitioner, it may issue a longer-term order of protection to provide extended protection. Conversely, if the risk is deemed less severe or temporary, the court may opt for a shorter-term order.

by
Published on:
Updated:
Published on:

by

In New York family court, obtaining an order of protection requires meeting a specific standard. Pursuant to the Family Court Act, the petitioner must demonstrate the existence of family offenses by a fair preponderance of the evidence. This standard necessitates showing that it is more likely than not that the alleged conduct occurred. Family offenses include various acts such as harassment, assault, stalking, and other forms of domestic violence.

The petitioner bears the burden of proof in establishing the allegations of the family offense petition. This means they must present evidence and testimony to support their claims. The court evaluates the credibility of the witnesses and weighs the evidence presented before making a determination.

The court’s decision regarding the issuance of an order of protection is based on its findings of fact. It must determine whether the alleged conduct meets the criteria for a family offense and whether the petitioner has sufficiently proven their case. The court may consider factors such as the nature and severity of the alleged conduct, any history of violence or abuse, and the safety and well-being of the parties involved.

by
Published on:
Updated:
Published on:

by

V.A. v. L.S. 2023 N.Y. Slip Op. 51477 (N.Y. Fam. Ct. 2023) involved an application to extend an order of protection. Extending an order of protection in New York involves a legal process that aims to maintain the safety and well-being of individuals who have been subjected to domestic violence or other forms of harm. In the state of New York, orders of protection can be extended upon motion for a reasonable period of time upon a showing of good cause, as outlined in Family Court Act §842.

Good cause for extending an order of protection can be demonstrated through various factors, including the nature of the relationship between the parties, any instances of domestic violence or violations of the existing order of protection, and the safety concerns for the petitioner and any children involved. This may involve providing evidence of past incidents of abuse, threats, or harassment, as well as the potential for future harm if the order is not extended.

The process typically begins with the filing of a motion in the appropriate court, such as the Family Court where the original order of protection was issued. The petitioner, often with the assistance of legal counsel, presents arguments and evidence supporting the need for the extension. This may include witness testimony, police reports, medical records, or other documentation relevant to the case.

by
Published on:
Updated:
Published on:

by

In New York, obtaining a family court order of protection involves specific requirements for both temporary and final orders. For a temporary order, known as an ex parte order, the petitioner must demonstrate to the court that they have been subjected to or are in immediate danger of domestic violence or harassment by the respondent. This can be achieved through sworn testimony or evidence provided to the court.

Once a temporary order is granted, a final order of protection can be sought through a formal court hearing or by mutual agreement of the parties. To obtain a final order, the petitioner must present evidence of the alleged family offense, such as testimony, documents, or other supporting evidence. The respondent has the opportunity to present a defense and contest the allegations during the hearing.

For both temporary and final orders, the court will consider factors such as the nature of the relationship between the parties, any history of violence or harassment, and the current circumstances surrounding the request for protection. The court will issue the order if it determines that there is a sufficient basis to warrant protection for the petitioner.

by
Published on:
Updated:
Contact Information